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Dalmatian Islands Yacht Charter

Amazing crewed and independent sailing holidays in the Dalmatian Islands

Welcome

The Dalmatian Islands, a nautical paradise

A World Class Destination

The Dalmatian Islands are renowned for their variety and balance; you'll find exactly what you want in this world renowned sailing location.

A Family Favourite

Look no further for a perfect family sailing destination. Short-hop sailing, wonderful weather, calm seas and plenty of interesting things to see.

Lively villages and quiet bays

After a night out in a lively village to enjoy dinner and a few drinks, you won't need to go far to find a hidden bay to a quiet night to recharge.

Easy Sailing Conditions

The benign conditions of the Adriatic are perfect for any relaxing type of sailing holiday bathed in sunshine between the dotted Dalmatian islands.

Description

What you'll love about the Dalmatian Islands

The Dalmatian Islands are renowned for their variety and balance; you’ll visit terracotta roofed villages, find hidden restaurants, wander flagstone pathed alleys, enjoy cosmopolitan and lively towns, relax in quiet picturesque bays and experience wonderfully balanced sailing conditions. Don’t forget Italian influenced food, crystal clear waters and a wonderful Mediterranean climate.

Between Trogir and Split in the north to Dubrovnik in the south, there are seven large islands and numerous medium to small islands that offer a heady contrast of lively, exciting harbours, imposing fortress towns, restaurants, bars and conversely; small bays, hidden coves, quiet moorings and traditional Croatian restaurants. For one-week charters, Korcula is generally the furthest point for itineraries departing from both Split and Dubrovnik.

 

The largest islands in the Dalmatians are Solta, Brac, Hvar, Vis, Lastovo, Korcula and Mljet. It is Hvar that has drawn the most attention in recent years, with a justified and growing reputation as a lively, cosmopolitan party town with direct and fast ferry links to Split on the mainland. It is typical of Croatia however, that only one mile from Hvar lies a small and perfectly formed archipelago called the Pakleni Islands, offering an idyllic haven for yachties beyond the crowds with numerous peaceful and relaxing bays in which to anchor.

 

There are plenty of other hidden gems as well, off the well beaten ‘ferry track’. Steer away from the main ferry ports and you’ll find some gorgeous spots. Look up Stiniva Bay on Vis, Maslinica on Solta and Pasadur on Lastovo. Also, many other islands such as Bisevo and Scedro have very infrequent ferry connections anyway.

GALLERY

What you'll love about the Dalmatian Islands

SAILING ITINERARIES

Dalmatian Islands sailing itineraries

1 Week - Split Family Route

Day 1 - Maslinica (Solta Island)

The village of Maslinica lies on the west coast of Solta and is sheltered by a group of six small islands. Protection from all but the strongest westerly winds is good thanks to a long breakwater extending from the southern shore. It’s worth getting here early as it’s a popular stop, laid moorings, water and electricity are all available. The small village is worth wondering around, you may also catch a lovely sunset depending on where you are.

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Day 2 - Vrboska (Hvar Island)

Vrboska lies at the end of a long, twisting inlet with a quay running most of its length. The town has a strong Venetian feel to it with plenty of Gothic and Renaissance houses dotted around. There is an established marina here as well as plenty of town quay space.

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Day 3 - Stari Grad (Hvar Island)

Stari Grad is the perfect retreat for those wishing to see a more relaxed side to Island life than Hvar town has to offer It's situated in a deep, well protected bay on the north coast of Hvar Island,

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Day 4 - Vis (Vis Island)

The town of Vis is in the north-eastern part of Vis island and enjoys good protection from the surrounding bay. The furthest island from the Croatian coast, Vis was under Yugoslav military control for decades which only ended in 1989.

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Day 5 - Pakleni Islands

If you haven’t already visited the more northern Croatian islands (Kornati & Kvarner), the Pakleni archipelago gives you a good indication of what they’re like. This unique stretch of islands on the south coast of Hvar are a real treat to visit.

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Day 6 - Milna (Brac Island)

Milna is located on the western side of the Brac Island. With its spacious outer and narrow, shallow inner parts is the best and most sheltered harbour on the island, a fact that hasn’t gone unnoticed by generations of seafarers.

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Day 7 - Trogir (Mainland)

Another jewel in Croatia’s crown. This beautiful UNESCO world heritage village offers everything Split can but in a charming little package. Located on its own little island Trogir is surrounded by large town walls which house cobble stone paths, family run restaurants and a surprising number of shops. We can’t recommend visiting enough!

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1 Week - Dubrovnik Route

Day 1 - Lopud (Lopud Island)

Lopud forms part of a small chain of islands referred to as the Elafiti Islands. Churches and monasteries date from the 16th century, when the inhabitant’s sea going exploits were legendary. The actual village is made up of stone houses surrounded by exotic looking gardens.

Day 2 - Polace (Mljet Island)

Luka Polace is virtually landlocked and therefore very well protected. Polace is the best place to leave your yacht while you explore the two deep, forest-shrouded saltwater lakes of the National Park on land. It’s about a forty five minute walk over to the lakes via Montokuc hill. Alternatively you can hire a bicycle to admire the beauty.

Day 3 - Pasadur (Lastovo Island)

Lastovo is one of the less visited islands in the area, which is one of the reasons it’s worth visiting. The island is covered in thick forests and the coastline is no less dramatic. Due to being a five hour ferry ride from Split few tourists visit meaning you’ll certainly find a quiet spot or two!

Day 4 - Korcula (Korcula Island)

Korcula is rich in vineyards, olive groves, small villages and hamlets. The island’s dense woods led the original Greek settlers to call the island Korkyra Melaina (Black Korcula). Its main settlement, Korcula Town, is a gorgeous grid of marble streets and impressive architecture. With a population of around 3000 inhabitants, Korcula Town is the largest settlement on the island, and is an absolute gem. It’s a beautiful walled town with narrow streets, old buildings, monuments, walls, towers, cafes, restaurants and bars.

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Day 5 - Sobra (Mljet Island)

On the north coast of Mjlet Island, situated in an unusually wide bay you’ll find the town of Sobra, the main point of entry to the island. Sobra is a small fishing town which supplies the nearby Babino Polje. Here you’ll find the quiet rhythm of life you’d expect. Local restaurants have laid mooring lines meaning it’s easy to moor in the bay.

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Day 6 - Sipanska Luka (Sipan Island)

Sipan is the largest island in a chain lying two miles of the mainland coast. Most of the islands making up this chain are heavily forested and unspoilt. Sipanska Luka is the largest of the villages on the island and also serves as the main ferry terminal. You’ll find a couple of laid moorings here but you will most likely need to anchor.

Day 7 - Dubrovnik (Mainland)

This large medieval walled city is a magnificent port of call, being famously hailed as the ‘pearl of the Adriatic’ by George Bernard Shaw. Regardless of whether you are visiting Dubrovnik for the first time or the hundredth, the sense of awe and beauty when you set eyes on the Stradun never fades. Indeed it’s hard to imagine anyone becoming jaded by the city’s marble streets, baroque buildings and the endless shimmer of the Adriatic, or failing to be inspired by a walk along the ancient city walls that have protected this civilised, sophisticated republic for five centuries.

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1 Week - Split Longer Route

Day 1 - Supetar (Brac Island)

Often overlooked in comparison to the better known Bol, Supetar is a pleasant little town. There is a historic core of old stone streets which fan out from the little harbour which is dominated by an imposing church. The town is popular with Croatian locals which we think is a great recommendation in itself!

Day 2 - Komiza (Vis Island)

Komiza has a picturesque bay sat at the foot of Hum mountain. The town has a fan following who enjoy it’s bohemian, rough-around-the-edges charm. Narrow back streets are lined with 17th and 19th century stone town houses which twist uphill from the port. Fisherman have been based here since at least the 12th century.

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Day 3 - Zaklopatica (Lastovo Island)

Lastovo was, for many years, a military island and access has only been permitted to visiting yachts for the last 15 years. Combine this with it’s relative remoteness given its distance from the mainland means few visit it. It’s for those precise reasons that you should go, hills covered in thick forests with winding paths mean it’s one of few places you can walk for hours without meeting anyone or anything.

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Day 4 - Brna (Korcula Island)

Brna sits nestled at the end of a wide bay, which is split by the Mali Zaglav peninsula, on the south coast of Korcula Island. The town used to be a non-urbanized bay with the only couple of small houses used by local fishermen, where people from nearby Smokvica would stay overnight before long fishing days. It developed in the 19th century at the time of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, when the pier was built to be used as a port for the village of Smokvica to export of local wine. The small village has a variety of restaurants, but is relatively rarely visited by yachtsmen as most pass by it on their way to better known places such as Vela Luka.

Day 5 - Pakleni islands

If you haven’t already visited the more northern Croatia islands the Pakleni islands give you a good indication of what they’re like. A unique stretch of islands on the south coast of Hvar are a real treat to visit. You can either choose to moor in one of the many sheltered bays or to stay in the marina which offers all the usual creature comforts associated with Croatian marinas.

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Day 6 - Drvenik Veli

Drvenik Veli is one of a pair of islands which provide a barrier between Split and the open sea. On the eastern side of the island the water almost glows this amazing electric blue colour which is fantastic to anchor around. Opposite this on the western side of the island is a small quiet inlet perfect for the final night outside the mainland.

Day 7 - Split (Mainland)

The largest city on the Adriatic Coast, seaside delight Split has been under Roman, Venetian, Austrian, French, Italian and Yugoslav control. There is an abundance of restaurants and wine cellars. The palace and the Split old town (Stari Grad) that was built around it still houses a large number of Croatian families and is a fine example of an old city centre that has not yet lost its character to invading tourists.

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2 Week - All Dalmatian Islands

Day 1 – Sipanska Luka (Sipan Island)

Sipan is the largest island in a chain lying two miles off the mainland coast. Most of the islands making up this chain are heavily forested and unspoilt. Sipanska Luka is the largest of the villages on the island and also serves as the main ferry terminal. You’ll find a couple of laid moorings here but you will most likely need to anchor.

Day 2 - Polace

Luka Polace is virtually landlocked and therefore very well protected. Polace is the best place to leave your yacht while you explore the two deep, forest-shrouded saltwater lakes of the National Park on land. It’s about a forty five minute walk over to the lakes via Montokuc hill. Alternatively you can hire a bicycle.

Day 3 - Korcula

Korcula is rich in vineyards, olive groves, small villages and hamlets. The island’s dense woods led the original Greek settlers to call the island Korkyra Melaina (Black Korcula). Its main settlement, Korcula Town, is a gorgeous grid of marble streets and impressive architecture. It’s a beautiful walled town with narrow streets, old buildings, monuments, walls, towers, cafes, restaurants and bars.

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Day 4 – Sucuraj (Hvar island)

For those who wish to enjoy a relaxing pace and escape the noise, crowds and hustle and bustle of everyday life, Sucuraj is the ideal spot. Located on the eastern point of Hvar island, Sucuraj enjoys the rare benefit of having both a northerly and southerly beach - Bilina and Cesminica respectively. It’s well worth a visit to the waterfront wine cellar of Vjeko Vujnovic for a tasting.

Day 5 – Pucisca Town (Brac)

Often listed as one of the prettiest villages in Europe, Pucisca is situated in a deep natural bay on the north coast of Brac island. Known for its striking white limestone Pucisca is home to Europe’s largest stone quarry and Croatia’s only school for stonemasonry. It’s even rumoured that stone from here was used to build the white house!

Day 6 – Trogir

Trogir – another jewel in Croatia’s crown. This beautiful UNESCO world heritage village offers everything Split can but in a charming little package. Located on its own little island Trogir is surrounded by large town walls which house cobble stone paths, family run restaurants and a surprising number of shops. We can’t recommend visiting enough!

Day 7 – Maslinica (Solta Island)

The village of Maslinica lies on the west coast of Solta and is sheltered by a group of six small islands. Protection from all but the strongest westerly winds is good thanks to a long breakwater extending from the southern shore. It’s worth getting here early as it’s a popular stop, laid moorings, water and electricity are all available. The small village is worth wondering around, you may also catch a lovely sunset depending on where you are.

Day 8 – Hvar (Hvar Island)

Hvar Town is estimated to draw around 20,000 people a day in the high season. It’s odd that they can all fit in the small bay town, where 13th-century walls surround beautifully ornamented Gothic palaces and traffic-free marble streets, but fit they do. Visitors wander along the main square, explore the sights on the winding stone streets, swim on the numerous beaches or pop off to the idyllic Pakleni Islands, but most of all they party at night.

Day 9 - Komiza (Vis Island)

Komiza has a picturesque bay sat at the foot of Hum mountain. The town has a fan following who enjoy it’s bohemian, rough-around-the-edges charm. Narrow back streets are lined with 17th and 19th century stone town houses which twist uphill from the port. Fisherman have been based here since at least the 12th century.

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Day 10 – Vela Luka (Korcula island)

Situated at the western end of Korcula Island and snuggled up in a deep bay, Vela Luka offers potential for some breath-taking sunsets. Despite being the biggest town on the island Vela Luka is somewhat quieter and less expensive than Korcula town. A major draw here is the ancient Vela Spila or Great Cave, where you can explore the homes of your prehistoric ancestors. It is believed these caves were inhabited more than 20,000 years ago and archaeologists have made hordes of discoveries in recent years.

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Day 11 - Uble (Lastovo Island)

Lastovo is one of the most stunning and least visited islands in the area, which is one of the reasons it’s worth visiting. The island is covered in thick forests and the coastline is no less dramatic. Due to being a five hour ferry ride from Split few tourists visit meaning you’ll certainly find a quiet spot or two!

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Day 12 - Pomena

Pomena is a small village as well as a harbour located at the west end of Island of Mljet, about 2 km away from village of Govedari. Pomena has just over 50 permanent inhabitants. Being located on just over 15 minutes walk to Malo Jezero (Small Lake) of Mljet National Park, Pomena nowadays has its hotel, couple of restaurants, coffee bars and souvenir shops.

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Day 13 - Sobra

On the north coast of Mjlet Island, situated in an unusually wide bay you’ll find the town of Sobra, the main point of entry to the island. Sobra is a small fishing town which supplies the nearby Babino Polje. Here you’ll find the quiet rhythm of life you’d expect. Local restaurants have laid mooring lines meaning it’s easy to moor in the bay.

Day 14 –Dubrovnik

If you didn’t have time or didn’t get the opportunity to visit Dubrovnik then it’s an absolute must. Inside the old town there is a maze of alleys and cobbled streets packed with small tourist shops and restaurants to explore. Definitely take the walk around the walls of the city and visit the cafes nestled on the cliffs between the city walls and the sea, where you can enjoy the view and those more adventurous among you can even jump from the cliffs into the water below.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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More Advice

Helpful Hints

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Wind Conditions

Croatia is one of the most northerly sailing areas in the Mediterranean and therefore tends to have a slightly shorter season than other more southerly countries. June and September enjoy settled weather, with temperatures in the late twenties. During the peak months of July and August, temperatures are consistently in the early 30s. May is increasingly becoming a great month to sail in Croatia as the weather is generally very good, but the prices are fantastic. The sailing winds in Croatia are generally excellent, with winds very rarely stronger than Force 4 (moderate breeze) in summer. A wind called the ‘Bora’ does bring stronger wind, but this is a winter wind that only very rarely features even early and late season. During the peak season the risk is not of enough wind, rather than too much.

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How to Get Here

To the sail the Dalmatians you will fly to either Split or Dubrovnik. There are a range of flights to Split airport on offer from around the UK, including London, Bristol, Manchester, Newcastle and Leeds. To Dubrovnik, there are flights again from London, Manchester, Birmingham and Edinburgh has a direct flight too. Check for others, as more flights are added every day. None of our bases are more than 40 minutes from their respective airports, with many such as Split and Trogir, being just 20 minutes away.

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Our Bases

Due to the relatively small size of a lot of the bases in Croatia, our Dalmatian yachts are shared amongst six bases; Trogir (which has three futher interchangeable marinas), Kastela Marina, ACI Marina Split, Solta, Rogoznica and Dubrovnik. All the marinas, apart from Dubrovnik, readily serve the northern Dalmatian Islands and so are interchangeable. Dubrovnik stands alone in the very south of Croatia and offers a southern entry point into the Dalmatian Islands. Dubrovnik Marina is 40 minutes from the airport.

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Mooring Fees

There are mooring fees in Croatia. Simply, this is a charge incurred for mooring your yacht overnbight in a safe, secure location. The prices are based on numerous factors including the type of mooring (marinas, mooring buoys, or on town quays), the time of year and the size of your yacht. We recommend that you budget €400 for an average sized yacht doing a ‘normal’ mixed itinerary of anchorages, marinas, town quays and mooring buoys. You are ultimately in control and can reduce or increase this cost depending on where you moor. Marinas are the most expensive while anchoring is typically free.

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Sailing Qualifications

To charter bareboat in Croatia you are required to have a valid sailing qualification issued by a recognised authority (e.g RYA, IYT, USSA). Alongside this you will also need a separate VHF radio licence. In some cases ‘shorebased’ certificates are also accepted, but please check these before booking. To charter large catamarans (over 30 GT) you will need a minimum of an RYA Yacht Master, or equivalent, plus the VHF licence.

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Money and Currency

The currency in Croatia is the Kuna. There are plenty of cash machines and bureau de change on the islands so withdrawing money and changing alternative currencies is possible. We recommend you arrive with some local currency to cover the first couple of days of your holiday. Cards are accepted in supermarkets but most tavernas and tourist shops only accept cash.

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Language

The national language of Croatia is Croatian! However, English is widely spoken and understood throughout, especially within the service industry, including taverna staff and taxi drivers. All Seamaster partners and crew speak English proficiently.

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Dalmatian Islands Weather

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