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Stunning Sardinia Yacht Charters,
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Enjoy a stunning skippered, crewed or bareboat sailing holiday to Sardinia

Welcome

Sailing Sardinia... Golden beaches and emerald waters

Our most popular Italy area

Sardinia is our most popular Italian sailing area, and with good reason. Sail from island to island, visiting sandy beaches, small villages, and idyllic anchorages along the way.

Outstanding natural beauty

Sardinia sailing is dominated by the La Maddalena National Park, a stunning geomarine reserve with pristine land and seascape with emerald waters, golden sands, and splendid seabeds.

Island to island sailing

In addition to Sardinia itself, there are at least 60 islands and islets that offer stunning bays, villages, anchorages and interest to this area. You'll also visit Corsica, for a French cherry on top!

Balanced sailing conditions

Sardinia is a genuine sailing destination, where you will get excellent sailing breezes. It's typically Mediterranean with light conditions in the morning, building through the day.

Description

What you'll love about sailing in Sardinia

Our most popular Italian sailing destination, Sardinia has all the magical ingredients that make a sailing holiday so special; golden sandy beaches, a pristine marine national park, a thriving local culture, great climate, wonderful food & what gives the ‘Costa Smeralda’ (Emerald Coast) its name – beautifully clear emerald waters.

From our base at Portisco you sail the north east of Sardinia, known as the Costa Smeralda (Emerald Coast), all the way to Santa Teresa Gallura and then across to Bonifacio on the island of Corsica. The craggy shoreline of Sardinia is crammed with sandy inlets or small harbours that have been developed into marinas, however, it is with the archipelago off the main island that Sardinia comes into its own. The La Maddalena Archipelago National Park lies just off the north east coast of Sardinia, and consists of no less than 62 islands and islets over a total sea area of more than 15,000 square hectares.

 

With its 180km of coastline, the La Maddalena Archipelago includes some of the most famous and charming beaches of the Mediterranean, in particular: Spiaggia Rosa (the pink beach) and Spiaggia del Cavaliere in Budelli, the beaches of Cala Coticcio and Relict in Caprera. Cala Corsara and Cala Granara in Spargi are also worth a mention.

 

La Maddalena is the largest island and capital of the eponymous archipelago. It is the only inhabited island, except for the village of Stagnali on Caprera Island and some small seasonal settlements on the island of Santa Maria.

 

Caprera, Spargi and Spargiotto, Budelli, Razzoli and Santa Maria, Nibani, Mortorio, Soffi and Camere are all islands of interest and well worth a visit to their beautiful lagoons and sandy beaches.

 

To top it off, pop across to the French island of Corsica to visit Bonifacio, a stunning harbour town precipitously perched on high cliffs directly over the Mediterranean sea.

 

Sardinia’s attractions come at a price and in places this can be a high price. As a hot spot that attracts international sports stars, business leaders and celebrities, prices in some places are higher than those in almost all of our destinations (Amalfi Coast perhaps the exception). This includes the mooring fees, which in Porto Cervo and some isolated mainland (‘main island’) ports, some of the most expensive anywhere in the Mediterranean.

GALLERY

What you'll love about sailing in Sardinia

SAILING ITINERARIES

Sardinia Suggested Sailing Itineraries

1 Week - Sardinia Route (Bonifacio)

Day 1 – Portisco

Located at the southern end of the famous Costa Smeralda (Emerald Coast), Portisco has a natural harbour that is sheltered from the Mediterranean currents and winds by its inland location, resulting in a great starting location for a sailing holiday. There is a small selection of shops and restaurants in the marina.

Day 2 – Tavolara Island

Hidden along the east coast of Sardinia, this tiny strip of land — just over three miles long and a mile wide — is one of the Mediterranean’s best-kept secrets. The island has resisted building more houses or hotels to cater for tourists. There is a locally appointed king, one restaurant, one bar and a beach.

Day 3 – Caprera Island

This island is a national monument thanks to the famous Italian hero Giuseppe Garibaldi buying it. You can visit his house which is now a museum and is located at Porto Garibaldi. The village itself is typical and with very hospitable locals.

Day 4 – Bonifacio (Corsica)

The strait between Bonifacio and Sardinia is one of the windiest locations in the metiterranean due to winds funnelling between the two islands. Note the wind is calmest first thing in the morning. Don’t be put off as on arrival at Bonifacio you’ll be treated to possible the most spectacular natural harbours in the Mediterranean, it’s an absolute must see!

Day 5 – Budelli Island

Budelli is famed for its pink sand made from coral which has been smashed by the sea over the years. The island is now heavily protected to ensure it’s preserved for future visitors. You’ll find some fantastic anchorages, especially around the southern part of the island.

Day 6 – Maddalena Island

Maddalena is the largest island in the archipelago and as you would expect is the busiest. You have a number of choices of ports; Cala Gavetta which is the main port and is a busy tourist town. Alternatively you could choose Cala Mangiavolpe which is east of Cala Gavetta, a little cheaper and with extremely helpful locals. Finally Cala Spalmaore which is a lovely well sheltered beach.

Day 7 – Olbia Town

If you didn’t get an opportunity to visit Olbia on your first night then we would recommend taking the time to go. It’s a town often overlooked in the rush to get to the Costa Smeralda and offers more than you might inititally think. There is a historic centre filled with boutiques, wine bars and pizza cafes. The town is well worth making the trip.

2 Week - Whole Corsica & Sardinia Route

Day 1 - Portisco

Located at the southern end of the famous Costa Smeralda (Emerald Coast), Portisco has a natural harbour that is sheltered from the Mediterranean currents and winds by its inland location, resulting in a great starting location for a sailing holiday. There is a small selection of shops and restaurants in the marina.

Day 2 – Bonifacio (Corsica)

The strait between Bonifacio and Sardinia is one of the windiest locations in the metiterranean due to winds funnelling between the two islands. Wind here tends to increase through the day, much calmer to sail across in the morning! Don’t be put off as on arrival at Bonifacio you’ll be treated to possible the most spectacular natural harbours in the Mediterranean, it’s an absolute must see!

Day 3 – Porto Vecchio (Corsica)

Porto Vecchio is around 25 miles north of Bonifacio and was originally a Roman then a Genoese port. The region has a long history of salt production which still thrives today. There are some superb beaches south of the town, or you could choose to wonder around the former fortifications within the town itself.

Day 4 – Campoloro (Corsica)

Campoloro provides a good stop over point on the eastern coast of Corsica. The marina can get very busy and is the only one in the area so it’s important to ring ahead and book a berth. On approach you’ll see the three clad mountains towering over the small port.

Day 5 – Capraia Island

Capraia is a small mountenous island between Corsica and Elba. The tourist industry on Capraia has only been active since 1986 and as a result the island is very much how it used to be. The only port on the northeast coast does get busy but it’s possible to anchor off in the bay. The island is a fantastic place for keen walkers thanks to its terrain. Supplies are limited so do keep this in mind.

Day 6 – Macinaggio (Corsica)

This quaint little village is on the northeast coast of Corsica. There is a small harbour protected by two moles. The village has relatively little to offer in terms of facilities but that’s made up by its charm and the warm welcome from the locals.

Day 7 – Saint Florent (Corsica)

Saint Florent was originally a busy fishing port but visiting bay boats have mainly replaced the fishing industry. The Genoese built the town in the 16th century and there are many monuments dotted around the town. The town also happens to be close to the Patrimonio vineyards if you fancy a spot of wine tasting.

Day 8 – Calvi (Corsica)

Calvi is tucked away in a sheltered bay on the north west of Corsica. In 1268 a citadel was built to protect against any invaders. A battle between the island of Corsica and mainland France over the integration of the island into the new French Republic saw the famous English Admiral Nelson lose his eye. The town is now a popular stopping point for people sailing from France towards Sardinia and Sicily.

Day 9 – Girolata (Corsica)

Girolata is a small bay tucked into the western coast of Corsica. The area of the island is a national reserve and so amenities are few and far between. However you will find a beach with a few small shacks selling locally caught fish. We wouldn’t recommend relying on being able to buy anything here, so take some supplies too.

Day 10 - Ajaccio (Corsica)

Day 11 - Propriano (Corsica)

Day 12 – Santa Teresa Gallura (Sardinia)

Santa Teresa Gallura was originally a Roman settlement who quarried the local granite for buildings such as the Pantheon in Rome. Around the town there are still some partly worked granite block to be seen. The modern town dating from the 19th century likes at the head of a narrow rocky inlet.

Day 13 – Maddalena Island

Maddalena is the largest island in the archipelago and as you would expect is the busiest. You have a number of choices of ports; Cala Gavetta which is the main port and is a busy tourist town. Alternatively you could choose Cala Mangiavolpe which is east of Cala Gavetta, a little cheaper and with extremely helpful locals. Finally Cala Spalmaore which is a lovely well sheltered beach.

Day 14 – Olbia Town

If you didn’t get an opportunity to visit Olbia on your first night then we would recommend taking the time to go. It’s a town often overlooked in the rush to get to the Costa Smeralda and offers more than you might inititally think. There is a historic centre filled with boutiques, wine bars and pizza cafes. The town is well worth making the trip.

Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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More Advice

Helpful hints

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Wind and Weather Conditions

The weather in Sardinia is generally hot and dry, with a six month summer from May to October. Sardinia enjoys 300 days of sunshine, with the most rain falling in the winter months from November to April. During the peak summer, temperatures rise to the early thirties. In May / October temperatures are in the early to mid 20s. Sardinia is a genuine sailing destination, with Force 4 (moderate winds) from the north-north west usual throughout the season and the risk of occasional stronger blows from the west. Stronger wind can become especially concentrated through the Bonifacio Straits between the north of the island and Corsica.

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How to Get Here

The best airport for our base in Sardinia is Olbia, in the north east of the island. Olbia airport enjoys direct flights from London, Manchester and Bristol on Saturdays. Our base at Portisco is just 40 minutes north of Olbia airport.

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Our Bases

Our primary base is located at Portisco, 40 minutes north of Olbia. In Portisco, there are actually two marinas side by side Portisco Marina and Cala dei Sardi. We also have yachts located in Cannigione, which is further north of Portisco and so offers a shorter transit to La Maddalena. Finally, there is also a selection of yachts available from Olbia town, which convenient to the airport and puts you in the heart of a lively characterful city.

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Mooring Fees

Mooring fees are a mixed bag in Sardinia and so should be approached with caution. The main Sardinia island marinas and harbours tend to be expensive, particularly Porto Cervo, which you shouldn’t even attempt. Expect to pay around €8 per metre during the summer. Strictly speaking, during peak summer overnight anchoring is not allowed up to 300m from the shore, but this rule though doesn’t seem to be followed strictly.

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Sailing Qualifications

To charter bareboat in Italy you are required to have a valid sailing qualification issued by a recognised authority (e.g. RYA, ASA, IYT, USSA). This qualification should not have any restriction on daylight hours or distance sailing from shore. If you have an RYA Day Skipper certificate or similar, for example, we recommend you should also obtain the International Certificate of Competence (ICC), which is accepted. RYA Yacht Master is, of course, accepted.

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Money and Currency

The currency in Italy is the Euro. There are plenty of cash machines and bureau de change can be found on the larger islands, so withdrawing money and changing alternative currencies is possible. We recommend you arrive with some local currency to cover the first couple of days of your holiday. Cards are accepted in supermarkets but most restaurants and tourist shops tend to prefer cash.

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Language

The national language of Italy is Italian! However, English is widely spoken and understood throughout, especially within the service industry, including restaurant staff and taxi drivers. All Seamaster partners and crew speak English proficiently.

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Typical Weather in Sardinia

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