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Wonderful sailing holidays to

the Saronic Islands

Bespoke sailing experiences in the Saronic Islands of Greece

Welcome

The most balanced all-round sailing experience in Greece

Diverse Greek Experience

Discover a cross section of everything great about Greece. Authentic villages, idyllic bays, deep cultural experiences and plenty of Greek tavernas!

A Family Favourite

The most diverse sailing destination in terms of experiences and most balanced for sailing conditions, it's a firm favourite for our family guests.

Village to village sailing

Every day you'll visit a new and lovely Greek village with a town quay bestowed with traditional Greek tavernas and friendly locals.

Balanced sailing conditions

With enough wind to get you around, but not enough to get you in trouble, the Saronics offer our guests a genuine sailing experience.

Description

What to Expect in the Saronic Islands

The most balanced of any sailing ground in Greece, the Saronics offer a fantastic mix of diverse islands, character harbours, archaeological treasures, gentle winds, short-hop sailing and quayside bars and tavernas. Perhaps counterintuitively, those on a two week charter (or those wanting to sail longer legs away from Athens) will discover the quietest sailing ground in Greece.

By strict definition, the Saronic Islands include just four islands: Salamis, Aegina, Poros and Angistri. However, we include the islands of Hydra, Dokos and Spetses in the mix – collectively the ‘Argosaronic Islands’. Whatever you do though, don’t forget the lovely mainland harbours as well, including Epidavros, Ermioni, Vathi and a host of lovely villages stretching down the long Peloponnese peninsula from Nafplion to the incredible town of Monemvasia.

 

 

Many start with a false impression that due to the close proximity to Athens that this area will be ‘packed to the gunwales’. Fortunately, as there is just the one main marina in Athens serving both the large Saronic and Cyclades Islands, the reality is much better.

 

Sure, it gets as busy as other destinations in peak season, but it may surprise you to know that for a two week sailing holiday, this is arguably the ‘least busy’ destination in the Mediterranean. The further you sail from Athens the quieter it gets. As most people only do a one-week holiday, beyond this radius is appreciably quieter and more serene.

GALLERY

What to Expect in the Saronic Islands

SAILING ITINERARIES

Saronic Islands Suggested Sailing Itineraries

1 Week - Athens Route (Spetses)

Day 1 - Ayia Marina (Aegina Island)

Located on the northeast coast of the Island of Aegina, Agia is a great place to stop on your first night if you can get out of Alimos Marina early. It’s a favourite summer destination for Greeks and tourists alike, with big sandy beaches and shallow waters good for families. Why not take this opportunity to visit the temple of Aphaia. Formerly known as the temple of Jupiter Panhellenius, this iconic Greek landmark stands on a 160m peak on the eastern side of the island approximately 13km by road from the Marina.

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Day 2 - Hydra Town (Hydra)

Hydra is truly the gem of the Saronic Gulf and stands alone among Greek islands as the one free of motorised vehicles. No cars. No scooters. Just tiny marble-cobbled lanes, donkeys, rocks and sea. Following the filming of the 1950’s film ‘Boy on a Dolphin’ with Sofia Loren, the islands population of artists exploded, and Hydra became as famous as St. Tropez or Portofino. In addition to the island’s exquisitely preserved stone architecture, criss-crossing rural paths and clear, deep waters, you can find a good cappuccino along the harbour which is great for people-watching.

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Day 3 - Spetses Town (Spetses)

Spetses is a small island, only around 7km from one end to another. The Island offers green landscapes with pine tree forests, hilly mountains and nice beaches. The capital town of the same name is characterized by its terracotta roofed houses and rich history. We recommend a visit to the Monastery of Agios (Saint) Nikolaos, the patron saint of sailors, just outside Spetses town. Its open to visitors although long trousers/ skirts and covered shoulders is a requirement.

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Day 4 - Ermioni (Mainland)

Ermioni is a small seaside town on the eastern coasts of Peloponnese, in the region of Argolis. Constructed on the hill slopes around a beautiful port, this town has been revived over the last few decades as many Athenians have holiday homes there. Mooring is available both to the North and South of the headland so it’s best to make a decision based on the direction of the wind.

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Day 5 - Poros Town (Poros)

Poros is separated from the mountainous Peloponnese by a narrow sea channel, and its protected setting makes the main settlement of Poros Town seem like a cheery lakeside resort. Its pastel-hued houses stack up the hillside to a clock tower and make a vibrant first impression. The island is characterised by lush pine trees, vegetation, crystal clear bays and a lively waterfront adorned with shops, cosy cafes and restaurants.

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Day 6 - Perdika (Aegina Island)

Just 13 miles from Athens, in the middle of the Saronic Gulf, lies the island of Aegina. Beyond its bustling port, Aegina has the seductive, easy going character of a typical Greek island but with the added bonus of more than its fair share of prestigious ancient sites. Aegina’s treats include a special, and delicious, pistachio nut, the splendid 5th-century Temple of Aphaia and the magical Byzantine ruins called Paleohora.

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Day 7 - Alimos Marina (Athens)

The ancient city of Athens offers some of the worlds most amazing historical sites which should be on every visitors 'to-do lists'. We'd recommend catching the tram, which runs past the entrance of the marina, into the city centre to explore places like the Parthenon.

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2 Week - Athens Route (Nafplion)

Day 1 - Alimos Marina (Athens)

Athens is a fantastic stepping stone to the Saronic Islands, though we wish the same could be said of Alimos Marina. Government owned, Alimos suffers from under investment in the number of berths and quality of the facilities so we recommend getting out of there as soon as you can.

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Day 2 - Ayia Marina (Aegina)

Located on the northeast coast of the Island of Aegina, Agia is a great place to stop on your first night if you can get out of Alimos Marina early. It’s a favourite summer destination for Greeks and tourists alike, with big sandy beaches and shallow waters good for families. Why not take this opportunity to visit the temple of Aphaia? Formerly known as the temple of Jupiter Panhellenius, this iconic Greek landmark stands on a 160m peak on the eastern side of the island approximately 13km by road from the marina.

Day 3 - Poros Town (Poros)

Poros is separated from the mountainous Peloponnese by a narrow sea channel, and its protected setting makes the main settlement of Poros Town seem like a cheery lakeside resort. Its pastel-hued houses stack up the hillside to a clock tower and make a vibrant first impression. The island is characterised by lush pine trees, vegetation, crystal clear bays and a lively waterfront adorned with shops, cosy cafés and restaurants.

Day 4 - Hydra Town (Hydra)

Hydra is truly the gem of the Saronic Gulf and stands alone among Greek islands as the one free of motorised vehicles. No cars. No scooters. Just tiny marble-cobbled lanes, donkeys, rocks and sea. Following the filming of the 1950’s film ‘Boy on a Dolphin’ with Sofia Loren, the island's population of artists exploded, and Hydra became as famous as St. Tropez or Portofino. In addition to the island’s exquisitely preserved stone architecture, criss-crossing rural paths and clear, deep waters, you can find a good cappuccino along the harbour which is great for people-watching.

Day 5 - Kyparissi (Peloponnese)

Nestled in a wide bay on the south-eastern coast of the Peloponnese peninsula Kyparissi may at first feel like you’ve sailed off the edge of the map. It’s the kind of place that when you find it you want to keep it a secret for fear of ruining your newfound peace and tranquillity. It’s been featured in the book ‘the most beautiful villages of Greece’ and was an ancient sanctuary of Asclepius the God of medicine. This is where it really starts paying off putting in that extra sailing time as you get away from the places easily reached from Athens within a week.

Day 6 - Plaka (Peloponnese)

Plaka is a small village just south of the river 'Rema Dafnon'. There is a small quay which will provide mooring for around ten yachts. There is a small selection of tavernas near the waterfront. Alternatively, the small town of Leonidio is a six minute journey by taxi where you'll find a range of shops and restaurants to wander around.

Day 7 - Paralio Astros (Peloponnese)

Paralio Astros is a beach resort for the village of Astros. Given its location it's a relatively untouched area and is popular with Greeks. There are two beaches, one of which is sandier than the other. The village has a charming shopping street where you'll discover that shops are open only in the mornings and evenings as siestas are popular here! You'll find authentic Greek food and an ancient castle to explore, if you're feeling energetic.

Days 8 & 9 - Nafplion (Peloponnese)

Nafplion is one of the of the most beautiful towns in the Peloponnese and is rumoured to be the most romatic city in Greece. It was the first capital of the newly born Greek state between 1823 and 1834. Frankish, Venetian and Turkish conquerors all left their mark on the town and have strongly influenced its culture, architecture and traditions. Ancient walls, medieval castles, monuments and statues are just some of the things you should see when visiting this beautiful town.

Day 10 - Vivari (Peloponnese)

Vivari is a small fishing village and was the location of one of the first commercial fish farms. A new one has replaced it but thankfully it is now out of sight of the village. As you would expect you'll find a wide choice of tavernas serving some fantastic fish dishes. The bay is well sheltered from the prevailing winds and you'll also find a nice beach a short walk along the coastline.

Day 11 - Spetses Town (Spetses)

Spetses is a small island, only around 7km from one end to the other. The island offers green landscapes with pine tree forests, hilly mountains and nice beaches. The capital town of the same name is characterised by its terracotta roofed houses and rich history. We recommend a visit to the Monastery of Agios (Saint) Nikolaos, the patron saint of sailors, just outside Spetses town. It's open to visitors although long trousers/ skirts and covered shoulders is a requirement.

Day 12 - Poros Town (Poros)

We liked Poros town so much that we decided to make another stop on the way back to Athens. Why not take this opportunity to explore more of the island’s tranquil forests and monastery? If, however, you just can’t get enough of the Peloponnese Peninsula then the rustic town of Galatas is just across the water and well worth a visit.

Day 13 - Perdika (Aegina Island)

Just 13 miles from Athens, in the middle of the Saronic Gulf, lies the island of Aegina. Beyond its bustling port, Aegina has the seductive, easy going character of a typical Greek island but with the added bonus of more than its fair share of prestigious ancient sites. Aegina’s treats include a special and delicious, pistachio nut, the splendid 5th-century Temple of Aphaia and the magical Byzantine ruins called Paleohora.

Day 14 - Alimos Marina (Athens)

The ancient city of Athens offers some of the world's most amazing historical sites which should be on every visitor's 'to-do list'. We recommend catching the tram, which runs past the entrance of the marina, into the city centre to explore places like the Parthenon.

Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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Day 1 : Milna

Pool Party

A beautiful protected bay on the West side of Brac. This town has stunning restaurants and a picturesque marina. We will arrive around midday when you can explore the town and have lunch before heading to Olife Club for a poolside party.

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More Details

Saronic Islands Information

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Wind and Weather

The weather in Greece from May to October is for the most part hot and dry. Early and late season, so May and October, you’ll experience temperatures between 22-25 degress, while during the peak months of July and August, the thermometer hits the mid-30s. Don’t forget your sunscreen and sunblock! The winds in the Saronics are generally excellent for sailing throughout the summer. Winds blow from the north east, but then change direction when further south, and blow south east up the Argolic Gulf toward Nafplion. Close in to land the winds stay very manageable, Force 3 (light winds), while you can go further out to find winds in the Force 5 (fresh winds) region.

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Our Bases

There are two primary bases serving the Saronic Islands and one secondary base. Primary are Alimos Marina and Agios Kosmas Marina on the southern border of Athens city itself, while south east of Athens is Lavrion, which straddles both the Saronic and Cyclades Islands, and so can be used for either area.

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How to Get Here

Athens is the only airport to serve the Saronic Islands. You are able to fly to Athens from around the UK, though frequency could be better. A great way to give yourself more options is to give yourself a day or two at the start or end of your holiday to enjoy Athens. You could also catch a connecting flight to/from Mykonos or Santorini and enjoy a land-based stay on those islands. From the airport, Alimos Marina is a 45 minutes transfer, Agios Kosmas Marina is 35 minutes and Lavrion is 30 minutes.

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Mooring Fees

Generally, there are little to no mooring fees in Greece, though this is changing slightly. At the time of writing (2021), mooring reemains free or around €10 per night, including filling with water and connecting to shore power.

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Sailing Qualifications

To charter bareboat in Greece you are required to have a valid sailing qualification issued by a recognised authority (e.g. RYA, ASA, IYT, USSA). This qualification should not have any restriction on daylight hours or distance sailing from shore. If you have an RYA Day Skipper certificate or similar, for example, you should also obtain the International Certificate of Competence (ICC), which is accepted. RYA Yacht Master is, of course, accepted.

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Money and Currency

The currency in Greece is the Euro. There are plenty of cash machines and bureau de change on the islands so withdrawing money and changing alternative currencies is possible. We recommend you arrive with some local currency to cover the first couple of days of your holiday. Cards are accepted in supermarkets but most tavernas and tourist shops tend to prefer cash.

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Language

The national language of Greece is Greek! However, English is widely spoken and understood throughout, especially within the service industry, including taverna staff and taxi drivers. All Seamaster partners and crew speak English proficiently.

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Typical Saronic Islands Weather

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